2017-10-06 05:50 #0 by: Niklas

When you photograph small things, like product or food photography, a photo studio can make the process easier. It doesn't have to cost a lot or take up much space.

The purpose of the studio in this guide is to be able to take photos with even lighting and no visible seams in the background. If you need a bigger photo studio, just scale things up using the same principles.

Studio lighting

You can use some kind of electric lights. My experience is that they are an unnecessary expense and don’t add enough value, unless you are mainly shooting when it’s dark outside.

A window, the bigger the better, facing away from the sun provide plenty of light and spreads it evenly to make soft shadows. When it’s overcast, a window facing the sun can be used. If you hang a medium thick white fabric in front of a sunny window, you may get nice looking shadows as well.

Studio background

The background can be fabric, paper, plastic and many other materials. I often use paper because it is cheap, available in different colors and easy to use. If you want to have a background with a visible texture, some kind of fabric may be a better choice.

Setting up the studio

This can be done in many different ways. If you are going to make it a permanent studio you probably want to put more time and effort into it. I like to keep it simple.

The aim is to set up the background to be both floor and background wall with an invisible segue between them. Position the studio so that light from the window comes from an angle you like. I usually want the light to come from the left or from behind my left shoulder.

Depending on how large your studio is, you can put it on a table or on the floor. A table makes a better working position.